2020 Prayer Intentions

Published on 28 Mar 2019

Pope Francis has recently entrusted his 2020 prayer intentions to the Pope’s Worldwide Prayer Network. They represent a wide array of challenges facing humanity and are the result of much prayer and discernment over the past several months. Areas in need of prayer in 2020 will include: the Way of the Heart, listening to migrant’s cries, freedom from addiction, respect for the planet’s resources and artificial intelligence to name a few.

You may view the prayer intentions for 2020 below, and review the ones already proposed for 2019 on the PWPN's website.

What is the process in the preparation of the prepared prayer intentions? The faithful from around the world suggest papal prayer intentions in each country to their national office, which selects some of them and sends those to the international office of the Pope’s Worldwide Prayer Network in Vatican City. Through prayerful discernment the international office selects a large number of them and submits them to the Pope to help his discernment. After his prayer and discernment he entrusts to the International Director of the Pope’s Worldwide Prayer Network the official set of monthly prayer intentions, which are then translated into the major world languages and published in print and digital formats.

“The discernment process that leads to the selection of the twelve monthly intentions is complex and consultative," said Fr David Stewart, Director of the Pope’s Worldwide Prayer Network in Britain. "This year, the Holy Father specifically asked for proposals from all of the faithful; many of these were adopted. Our national secretaries and the International Office in Rome, working with the Vatican’s Secretariat of State, worked hard to present draft proposals to the Holy Father. He then took these into prayer together with his own observations about the challenges that face humanity and the mission of the Church. Then he gives them back to us, his personal prayer network (and the largest prayer-group in the Church!).

"This inevitably takes time but we are often astonished at how relevant the intentions, although chosen well in advance, can be. This month’s, for persecuted Christian communities, is such an example. Of course, Pope Francis frequently suggests other pressing topics too. We can join him in those intentions, too, as we make our daily offering each morning."

JANUARY

Promotion of World Peace

We pray that Christians, followers of other religions, and all people of goodwill may promote peace and justice in the world.

FEBRUARY

Listen to the Migrants’ Cries

We pray that the cries of our migrant brothers and sisters, victims of criminal trafficking, may be heard and considered.

MARCH

Catholics in China

We pray that the Church in China may persevere in its faithfulness to the Gospel and grow in unity.

APRIL

Freedom from Addiction

We pray that those suffering from addiction may be helped and accompanied.

MAY

For Deacons

We pray that deacons, faithful in their service to the Word and the poor, may be an invigorating symbol for the entire Church.

JUNE

The Way of the Heart

We pray that all those who suffer may find their way in life, allowing themselves to be touched by the Heart of Jesus.

JULY

Our Families

We pray that today’s families may be accompanied with love, respect and guidance.

AUGUST

The Maritime World

We pray for all those who work and live from the sea, among them sailors, fishermen and their families.

SEPTEMBER

Respect for the Planet’s Resources

We pray that the planet’s resources will not be plundered, but shared in a just and respectful manner.

OCTOBER

The Laity’s Mission in the Church

We pray that by the virtue of baptism, the laity, especially women, may participate more in areas of responsibility in the Church.

NOVEMBER

Artificial Intelligence

We pray that the progress of robotics and artificial intelligence may always serve humankind.

DECEMBER

For a life of prayer

We pray that our personal relationship with Jesus Christ be nourished by the Word of God and a life of prayer.

This article was first published on the PWPN's website.