Journey into Freedom Day 20

Painting of Mary and Elizabeth

Preparation: Begin by stilling; then dedicating the time of prayer to God and asking God that all you think, feel and imagine are for the glory of God.

Gift: I ask that I may know Jesus more intimately, love him more dearly and follow him more closely.

Setting: Consider the Bible passage below, you can imagine you are Mary or Elizabeth or Zechariah. How does it look from their point of view?

Luke 1:39-45 HCSB

In those days Mary set out and hurried to a town in the hill country of Judah where she entered Zechariah’s house and greeted Elizabeth. When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the baby leaped inside her, and Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit. Then she exclaimed with a loud cry: “You are the most blessed of women, and your child will be blessed! How could this happen to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me? For you see, when the sound of your greeting reached my ears, the baby leaped for joy inside me! She who has believed is blessed because what was spoken to her by the Lord will be fulfilled!”



Painting of Mary and Elizabeth

Follow the meditation on Scripture with a conversation with God and a Final Prayer.

When you have finished the prayer note down in your jotter how the prayer went and what you want to take with you from this time of prayer.

A Thought for Today: In everyone's life, at some time, our inner fire goes out. It is then burst into flame by an encounter with another human being. We should all be thankful for those people who rekindle the inner spirit. - Albert Schweitzer

Imagination in Prayer

When we imagine a story like that of Mary going to visit her cousin Elizabeth we put ourselves in the picture as a character. Maybe we imagine ourselves to be Mary or Elizabeth, or perhaps Zechariah watching from inside the house. We fill in details of the story as we imagine they might have happened.

Just as each artist who paints the picture of this meeting imagines it in a different way, so each person who imagines the story in prayer will imagine it differently. We are not trying to recreate a historical story just as it happened. Instead we are allowing God to touch us through our own imagination. We will see what God wants us to see. Details which go unnoticed for other people might be particularly significant for us.

When we have finished our prayer, we need to look back and ask, “What is the significance of the way I have imagined that story; what is God saying to me?”